Alice's Adventures In Wonderland(1865) - Lewis Carroll Literary Quotes - Quotesmin.com

All Lewis Carroll Literary Quotes


Alice's Adventures In Wonderland Literary Quotes(1865) - Lewis CarrollRating Mail
After a fall such as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling downstairs!
[Ch. 1 - Down the Rabbit-Hole: Alice]
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All in the golden afternoon
Full leisurely we glide;
For both our oars, with little skill,
By little arms are plied,
While little hands make vain pretense
Our wanderings to guide.
[Opening poem, first stanza.]
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Thus grew the tale of Wonderland:
Thus slowly, one by one,
Its quaint events were hammered out
And now our tale is done
And home we steer, a merry crew,
Beneath the setting sun.
[Opening poem, stanza six.]
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Alice! a childish story take,
And with a gentle hand
Lay it where Childhood's dreams are twined
In Memory's mystic band,
Like pilgrim's withered wreath of flowers
Plucked in a far-off land.
[Opening poem, stanza seven.]
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Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice, 'without pictures or conversations?'
[Ch. 1 - Down the Rabbit-Hole: Opening paragraph.]
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There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the ordinary to hear the Rabbit say to itself 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!' ...but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out its waistcoat pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice startled to her feet.
[Ch. 1 - Down the Rabbit-Hole.]
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So many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible.
There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door, so she went back to the table, half hoping she might find another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle on it, ('which certainly was not here before,' said Alice,) and round the neck of the bottle was a paper label, with the words 'DRINK ME' beautifully printed on it in large letters.
[Ch. 1 - Down the Rabbit-Hole.]
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If you drink much from a bottle marked 'poison' it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later.
[Ch. 1 - Down the Rabbit-Hole: Alice]
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'Well, I'll eat it,' said Alice, 'and if it makes me grow larger, I can reach the key; and if it makes me grow smaller, I can creep under the door; so either way I'll get into the garden, and I don't care which happens!'
[Ch. 1 - Down the Rabbit-Hole.]
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Curiouser and curiouser!
[Ch. 2 - The Pool of Tears: Alice]
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How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale!
[Ch. 2 - The Pool of Tears: Alice; this is a parody of "Against Idleness and Mischief".]
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'Would it be of any use, now,' thought Alice, 'to speak to this mouse? Everything is so out-of-the-way down here, that I should think very likely it can talk: at any rate, there's no harm in trying.'
[Ch. 2 - The Pool of Tears.]
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'Stigand, the patriotic archbishop of Canterbury, found it advisable "'
'Found what?' said the Duck.
'Found it,' the Mouse replied rather crossly: 'of course you know what "it" means.'
'I know what "it" means well enough, when I find a thing,' said the Duck: 'it's generally a frog or a worm. The question is, what did the archbishop find?'
[Ch. 3 - A Caucus-Race and a Long Tale.]
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At last the Dodo said, 'everybody has won, and all must have prizes.'
[Ch. 3 - A Caucus-Race and a Long Tale.]
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Alice thought the whole thing very absurd, but they all looked so grave that she did not dare to laugh; and, as she could not think of anything to say, she simply bowed, and took the thimble, looking as solemn as she could.
[Ch. 3 - A Caucus-Race and a Long Tale.]
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Oh my ears and whiskers!
[Ch. 4 - The Rabbit Sends in a Little Bill: The White Rabbit]
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'It was much pleasanter at home,' thought poor Alice, 'when one wasn't always growing larger and smaller, and being ordered about by mice and rabbits. I almost wish I hadn't gone down that rabbit-hole and yet and yet it's rather curious, you know, this sort of life! I do wonder what can have happened to me! When I used to read fairy-tales, I fancied that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in the middle of one! There ought to be a book written about me, that there ought! And when I grow up, I'll write one.'
[Ch. 4 - The Rabbit Sends in a Little Bill.]
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The Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time in silence: at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth, and addressed her in a languid, sleepy voice.
'Who are you?' said the Caterpillar.
This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly, 'I I hardly know, sir, just at present at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.'
'What do you mean by that?' said the Caterpillar sternly. 'Explain yourself!'
'I can't explain myself, I'm afraid, sir' said Alice, 'because I'm not myself, you see.'
'I don't see,' said the Caterpillar.
'I'm afraid I can't put it more clearly,' Alice replied very politely, 'for I can't understand it myself to begin with; and being so many different sizes in a day is very confusing.'
[Ch. 5 - Advice from a Caterpillar.]
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You are old Father William,' the young man said,
'And your hair has become very white;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head
Do you think at your age it is right?'
In my youth,' Father William replied to his son,
'I feared it might injure the brain;
But, now that I'm perfectly sure I have none,
Why, I do it again and again.'
[Ch. 5 - Advice from a Caterpillar.]
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You don't know much,' said the Duchess, 'And that's a fact.'
[Ch. 6 - Pig and Pepper.]
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Speak roughly to your little boy,
And beat him when he sneezes:
He only does it to annoy,
Because he knows it teases.
[Ch. 6 - Pig and Pepper: The Duchess]
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'If everybody minded their own business,' the Duchess said in a hoarse growl, 'the world would go round a deal faster than it does.'
[Ch. 6 - Pig and Pepper.]
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I speak severely to my boy,
I beat him when he sneezes;
For he can then thoroughly enjoy
The pepper when he pleases!
[Ch. 6 - Pig and Pepper: The Duchess]
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Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?'
'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat.
'I don't much care where ' said Alice.
'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat
[Ch. 6 - Pig and Pepper.]
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But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
'Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: 'we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.'
'How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
'You must be,' said the Cat, 'or you wouldn't have come here.'
Alice didn't think that proved it at all; however, she went on 'And how do you know that you're mad?'
'To begin with,' said the Cat, 'a dog's not mad. You grant that?'
'I suppose so,' said Alice.
'Well, then,' the Cat went on, 'you see, a dog growls when it's angry, and wags its tail when it's pleased. Now I growl when I'm pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore I'm mad.'
[Ch. 6 - Pig and Pepper.]
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